About Me


Marianne Bayliss

I grew up in country New South Wales in a time when running under the sprinkler in your knickers without a jot of sunscreen was the norm for a six year old. I thought trips to the local library were akin to an adventure and I loved coming home with a stack of books. I loved reading them all. I loved the pictures, I loved the humour, I loved the twist at the end. However, I was sad when many of them seemed to be over too quickly. So when the librarian introduced me to the coloured dot system I found books just right for me: green dots equalled big kids books!

As the sprinkler runs changed to costume-clad trips to the swimming pool, then to ‘Reef’ sun tan coconut oil slathered on teenaged legs, the green dotted books gave way to books with no dots and then to the Wildfire teen romance series. Oh, how I loved that these teenaged protagonists understood exactly how I felt. I loved that they had their passions such as horse riding or ice skating, because I had mine too – dancing – and I loved how they knew what it was like to pine for the cute boy in class.

After finishing high school I moved to Sydney to study dance further and then won auditions which saw me travelling to Japan, Malaysia, Singapore and France. I lived in Paris for a year while dancing at the Moulin Rouge and was determined to improve my HSC French. I spoke as much French as possible, watched countless re-runs of Little House on the Prairie and bought Mills and Boon books. While the books greatly expanded my vocabulary in the area of breathing, sighing, touching and kissing I found it difficult to work this vocabulary into everyday parlance – even in the city of love!

I lived in a sweet studio apartment and would look out of my window and yearn to write about this but every attempt had me stopping before I started as I could never do justice to the amazing city and wrote little more than aerograms to friends and relatives.

At the end of the year I returned to Australia, started a family and earned dance teaching qualifications. I took my children to swimming lessons, covering them in sunscreen, rash vests and hats, opened my dance school and read hundreds of romances. My children are now grown, I continue to run my school and I read romances. I’ve also turned my hand to writing romance and I might finally manage to put elements of Paris in a novel.

I feel a research trip calling…

Books


Refuge for the Runaway Fiancée

Tessa McAuley had it all, or so she was (very insistently) supposed to think. Her shiny life included a mayor-to-be fiancé, money, a house and a very respectable social standing, but Tessa was missing something… herself.

June, once Tessa’s neighbour (and a woman who fled the ‘perfect’ life many years ago), lives with Matthew Beaumont as his housekeeper. Her understanding of Tessa’s turmoil and, more importantly, her residence being 4000km from Tessa’s life makes June the ideal destination for Tessa’s sudden escape. June, however, possesses secrets of her own that will hurt the one she loves the most.

Matthew Beaumont, handsomely handsome builder-come-artist, depends on June as his closest and longest-standing friend and confidante. Having been searching for his biological family throughout his adult life, Matthew would never understand the choice to leave everything that Tessa evidently has.

The undeniable and irresistible chemistry between Tessa and Matthew has not gone unnoticed, with their first kiss winning 3rd place in the RWA First Kiss Competition in 2016.

‘Refuge for the Runaway Fiancée’ is on track to be pitched to publishers mid-2018.

Work in Progress

Sara and Tom shared one unforgettable night together. It was one of those nights where nothing happens yet everything happens. Where conversation and laughter last from dusk to dawn and you fall in love as naturally as you smile.

The reveal that not only was Tom dating Sara’s sister Courtney, but that Courtney was pregnant saw Tom and Sara decide to do what’s right and put aside their feelings for each other.

Years later, with the pair having only seen each other a handful of times, Courtney dies, leaving Tom alone with their inconsolable toddler. Sara’s presence is the only thing that will soothe little Emma, but how can Sara and Tom reconcile when Tom is wracked with guilt and Sara is tormented by Courtney’s last words to her “I never want to see you near me or my family again.”?

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